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and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before pa
with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before panetta made his remarks to the i
as a result of rising prices and mounting attacks on un vehicles delivering supplies. the u.n. world food program is currently feeding one, 5 million people in syria, the vast majority displaced from their homes. the news comes after the u. n announcing they are cutting back and removing staffers from damascus. among the latest victims of violence in syria, nine students and a teacher were killed when their school was bombed in damascus. government forces have blamed rebels for the attack. nato has approved a request by turkey for the deployment of patriot missiles to its border with syria. turkey sought the missiles to defend itself from cross border violence. speaking in belgium, anders fogh rasmussen says the patriot missiles would serve as a deterrent to syria. >> i do believe that a deployment of patriot missiles will serve as an effective deterrent, and that way the escalate this situation along the syrian-turkish border. the mere fact that the patriot missiles have been deployed make it necessary for any potential aggressor to think twice before they even consider attacking turkey.
near damascus international airport. i should bear in mind, reuters reporting that two u.n. austrian peace-keepers were wounded, not life threateningly, but wounded near damascus airport. not clear by who. but that comes as reports of free syrian army rebels moving towards the airport within two kilometers, perhaps. emirates and egyptair cancelling flights until further notice, saying for the safety of the staff. and yesterday closed due to maintenance. something is certainly happening in that very significant airport to the east. that will be causing great tension in damascus. that link to the internet shut off and cell phones being down, as well. we can't tell. but certainly today for the first time i think in quite a number of weeks things are definitely changing on the ground of damascus and it looks like it's in the favor of the rebels. ashleigh? >> and i just want to be absolutely clear, you're coming to us from beirut at this moment, keeping a close eye. i know that our reporters who are based in lebanon next door to syria are trying at all times to get in and out of that coun
of the airport, now, all of this happens as the u.n. is warning after human catastrophe in syria and more than 40,000 people killed and the u.n. is saying now that nearly 700,000 syrians have been displaced and that could grow this winter as the violence continues, ands winter is starting to set in, to the human, the human effect of this is really starting to take a toll on syria and the wider region, there are refugees in turkey and jordan and causing huge problems, but the violence is continuing to escalate, and right now, kelly, it doesn't appear that there's any end in sight. >> kelly: all right. connor, connor powell reporting from jerusalem about the developments in syria and we're all very concerned about what's happening there. thank you, jamie? >> on the heels of that look at the middle east situation, let's get back to one of our top stories, new settlement construction in east jerusalem and the west bank after a successful bid at the united nations this week, gaining them nonmember observer state status. listen to secretary of state hillary clinton on that. >> we have to convince pales
precautions to protect the ambassador. jon: u.n. ambassador susan rice has been under fire for weeks for her public response to the attack. the ambassador calling it spontaneous and not linking it to terrorism in and several television interviews. however, dianne feinstein is coming to the ambassador's defense, saying that the talking points she was given were wrong. >> i do not believe the intelligence communities should prepare these talking points. i think additionally somebody should have picked up the phone and called and said, tell me the story, what happened. jon: congressman rogers is not convinced. he suggests that someone in the obama administration simply try to change the story. >> it really is beyond the talking points and susan rice. it was a political narrative designed not around what the intelligence said, but what about the best politics were for them. jon: joining us now to help break this down is bret baier. the interesting thing in one of those sound like i'm jim -- the interesting thing in one of those sound bites is what she should have talked about on morning televisi
states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound dug-in on capitol hill. >> all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it ne
. jenna: well do you like your internet just open and free. jon: i do, that's how i prefer it. jenna: a u.n. agency wants to -- well, maybe oversee the internet a little bit, create some new laws maybe for the internet. jon: they are so good at running things they are. jenna: there is an idea out there that the u.n. may put in some sort of new regulation for the internet. are they the right people to do it? what about sensor ships. big questions for our country and the web. we'll tell you about it next hour. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain th
was in new york. he was in america for the u.n. general assembly in september and i think wanted to come down and meet the president. and wasn't invited or that didn't happen. and then, you recall when the -- when that film that scurrilous film was made and attacks on the embassy in cairo and he was not quick to condemn the attacks and president obama let him know that the alliance was actually in question over that. but they seem to have gotten along very well over the efforts to combined effort to end the gaza conflict and we're on the phone a lot and both sides say, you know, achieved some sort of rappaport. >> thank you very much. >>> and just in, we're getting word the army private accused of leaking secrets to wick leaks is right now on the stand testifying in his defense. that's next. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next gr
that has tossed a country into chaos. team fox coverage continues now. jonathan hunt at the u.n. jonathan, this looks like the beginning of an end game to many. >> yeah. it certainly does. the rebels have clearly taken the decision within the past week that they cannot bring about the downfall of the assad regime without taking the battle directly to the capital damascus. they do not, however, yet have the fire power to win in one big final assault. so this is likely to be a war of attrition within damascus itself and president assad has gathered his hot best trained troops around his strong holds within the capital so this may well go on for days. butng to a lot of experts, the pressure on president assad is growing day by day. and that is why there is the concern about the use of these chemical weapons because they say in many ways now, president assad is like a cornered rat. shep? >> shepard: jonathan, still so many questions about what happens after assad. >> yeah, and that's one of the problems here for the international community. we have heard again and again just how many factions
that has something to doith iran and something else to do with the u.n. nuclear watchdog group called the iaea. just for some context here earlier this week we told you members of the iaea, which is the nuclear watchdog group for the u.n., getting their e-mails and information hacked. all signs pointed that iran was behind that. we also reported to you yesterday that the associated press has a diagram from supposedly inside iran that showed iran wanting to develop a nuclear weapon that would be three times as powerful as hiroshima. today what we're getting crossing on the wires right now the united states effectively set a march deadline for iran to start cooperating with the iaea and let the inspectors into the country for full access. the united states diplomat says if they do not do this, if iran does not start cooperating they are going to recommend that the u.n. security council take this up. now what that means and whether or not that is a credible threat to get iran to start working with this group is a big question. time will only tell. the timeline is of the utmost importance
majority of the u.n.'s 193 members. this measure would "reaffirm the right of the palestinian people to self determination and to independence in their state of palestine, on the palestinian territory, occupied since 1967." here is a look at how the land was divided. these are the 67 borders. secretary of state, hillary clinton says this bid if recognition is misguided and urge talks with israel for a two-state solution. after years of failed negotiations, and no two-state solution the palestinian president is ready for a rare symbolic victory. across the west bank and gaza palestinians are gathering in anticipation of the vote in their favor. u.n. recognition is mostly symbolic it could allow the palestinians to bring war crimes accusations against israel before the international criminal court. this comes amid growing tenses following the eight day conflict teen israel and the militant group that runs part of the palestinian territory, hamas. the palestinians are saying this is long overdue. >>jonathan: morale, legally, and politically, long overdue in the eyes of palestinians. the
is still a long way off. >> united states opposed the palestinian authority effort to have the u.n. general assembly to declare them to be an observer state but failed to prevent it which i think was a real defeat for the united states and israel. [ male announcer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. gives you a low $18.50 monthly plan premium... and select generic hypertension drugs available for only a penny... so you can focus on what really matters. call humana at 1-800-808-4003. so you can focus on what really matters. 5-hbut some people wondered oveabout caffeine.es. the executive director of the center for science in the public interest said, "overdoing caffeine alone is actually pretty difficult to do. someone would have to make an effort to consume 40 or so 200-mg caffeine tablets." or... about this much 5-hour energy... in a single day. we recommend... not more than two per d
in the u.n. a country. the legal ramifications for israel are not significant. and a month ago, a woman dies after doctors refused to perform her abortion. the woman's husband makes a major announcement today. let's go "outfront." we have breaking news. new details on the fiscal cliff deal that timothy geithner put on the table today during his meeting with congressional leaders on the hill. these details just coming in. jessica yellin has that and what have you learned about what geithner took you know, listed out with the numbers and put on the table? >> hey, erin, here are some of the details i'm getting from senior officials on both sides. the headline is that he put out a number of $1.6 trillion in new taxes. that was at according to republican officials, a surprise. they expected a much smaller number and that has some republicans crying foul. he proposes extending unemployment insurance. continuing the dock fix. that's approving additional spending on medicare to pay doctors. the amt patch protecting middle income americans. $50 billion in stimulus next year and in return, the ad
of junior nation status at the u.n. palestine is not officially a country so they're not officially a member of the u.n. they officially get to be observers of what happens at the u.n. this was a symbolic stamp of international approval for the political legitimacy of the palestinians. it may not have much practical impact, but politically speaking, it was the u.s. and israel that were desperately trying to have this vote today not happen. so that we would not to be shown to be so isolated in the world in terms of our country's perspective and the israeli perspective on this issue. the u.s. knew that the vote would look this lopsided which is why we did not want the vote to happen, but it happened anyway and it happened just like we knew it would. now what? also on your plate, after president obama took his big historic trip to burma this month, the first time a u.s. president has ever visited burma, the burmese government today attacked their own people using what is being described as incendiary devices to break up a protest of buddhist monks in their iconic flowing robes. also while you'r
. they want the u.n. to take over the thing in a matter of speaking. >>shepard: a republican senator is upping the ante on nominations of susan rice over benghazi. ambassador rice said the attack was the result of a respond tablous mob and officials say it was a terror attack and has insisted she was reading, repeating official talking points and the final version came from intelligence agencies and not the white house. that 'it were the intelligence community is now backing her. but susan collins is not accepting that claiming she was well aware this was a lot more to those talking points. and now the news from washington. catherine? >>reporter: since the closed classified briefings on capitol hill lawmakers say they shad access to unclassified access on the c.i.a. talking points and classified information and now a leading republican in the senate tells fox the classified information including a daily brief of the president containing the most highly classified intelligence and in this case included evidence of al qaeda involvement in the benghazi attack. here is senator collins speaking to
with israel. but the israeli ambassador to the u.n., ron prosor, warned that the palestinians are turning their backs on peace. >> for as long as president abbas prefers symbolism over reality, as long as he prefers to travel to new york for u.n. resolutions rather than travel to jerusalem for genuine dialogue, any hope of peace will be out of reach. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators said today they will push to cut off u.s. aid, if the palestinians use their new status to bring israel before the international criminal court. in iraq, a wave of attacks today killed at least 43 people. most of the victims were in the city of hillah, south of baghdad. back-to-back explosions targeted shi-ite pilgrims and emergency responders. the force of the blasts left twisted wreckage of cars outside shops in a busy commercial area. a third bombing killed six people near a shrine in the city of karbala. a year-long inquiry into british media practices ended today with a call for new regulation. lord justice brian leveson led the investigation. it was triggered by a scandal ov
second story out front, victory for palestinians. the u.n. general assembly voted in favor of palestinian state hood. we want to show you the wild celebrations going on right now. this is the west bank. after the u.n. overwhelmingly gave the palestinians something they have wanted for years and the vote was pretty overwhelming. 138 countries in favor. it was a shellacking for those against it. the resolution passed against the will of the united states, israel, canada and six other nations. here's u.n. ambassador susan rice after the vote. >> today's unfortunate and counterproductive resolution places further obstacles in the path to peace. that is why the united states voted against it. >> now, the vote gives the palestinians a higher profile at the u.n. and more important, it also means they can join organizations like the international criminal court. that is important because it could allow the palestinians to pursue war crime charges against israel. "outfront" tonight, the prime minister. good to see you again. so what does this vote mean for israel? >> it doesn't mean anything. i th
been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the biggest challenge for people today is distance. as the epidemic subsided over the last few months many treatment centers have been closed in the remote areas. getting to plays that remain open is a huge challenge that can take hours. and that delay can be fatal. this man, a 27-year-old mother of three, will lik
. bill: any chance republicans fold on raising tax rates? we will find out when we ask senator john f u.n. e, and conservatives say the fight is far from over. >> republicans have stood for one thing specifically, it's held them together, they are the low tax party. the other guys want to tax to match their reckless spending. if they give it up now in return for nothing obama wins and he wins big. are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. martha: unions are stopping work at another busy california port. this scene was last week when the workers picketed at the oakland port. now it is clerical workers at the port of los angeles and nearby long beach who are on strike as well. other unions, including the d
the move is in retaliation after the palestinians won a u.n. bid to be recognized as a non-member observer state. >>> syria may have no working internet right now, but the fighting is raging on. the country's civil war is focusing right new on damascus international airport on the outskirts of the capital there. rebels say they have surrounded it on one side. they are trying to keep the government's war jets grounded and stop its flow of weapons. syrian state-run tv insists the airport is functioning normally. >>> mexico will swear in a new president in just a few hours when enrique pena nieto takes the oath. he named his new cabinet yesterday, you see him here. he also took control of the armed forces in a traditional midnight ceremony. >> teaching children with autism isn't always easy, but help may be on the way from an unexpected place. an ipad app and a green robot. joe carter has more in today's "start small, think big." >> reporter: children with autism are getting help from a friendly creature. >> it's a robotic system designed to help people with autism learn and practice skills i
as quote, counterproductive to peace efforts. the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, warned that little will change in the palestinian territories after this vote. palestinians in gaza and the west bank flooded into the streets late into the night. they are shooting fireworks, waving flags, honking car horns in celebration. let's go live to cnn's fred pleitgen in ramallah with the latest. very big day for the palestinians. what are you seeing now? >> reporter: hi, wolf. well, the celebrations certainly have quieted down somewhat but it was really just in the past ten minutes that they did quiet down. before that, what happened was that these massive celebrations that you saw here on arafat square with people shooting fireworks, ak-47s and pistols into the air, then went into the side streets where people drove around in their cars, honking horns and certainly were very happy with the way that vote in the united nations general assembly went. to them, they say they believe it's actually very significant to the palestinians. they say they believe it could be a first step to fu
at the u.n., folks. palestinians get a big reward from that organization. how the u.s. and israel is reacting to that move. we'll tell you. martha: plus everyone from president obama to rapper jay-z is on "time" magazine's short list for person of the year but what does it say about leadership and who we are looking to in america right now when this south korean internet sensation is a serious contender for the magazine's cover page? ♪ . [ malannouncer ] it'that time of year again. time for cii price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supp
: a shocking real-life health crisis involving a former child star, why frankie m u.n. iz was rushed to the hospital. we are live at the breaking news desk. the new nears about chemical weapons in the civil war rocking syria, why the u.s. and the international community should be concerned. we'll go in-depth with ambassador bolton. jenna: right now we are learning about a serious health problem for a former child star, rick folbaum is live at the breaking news news desk with more. >> reporter: you don't usually hear about healthy 20 somethings having strokes. that's what doctors say happened to frankly m u.n. is. he was riding his motorcycle in phoenix when he lost vision in one eye. friends, including his fiancee got worried when he was acting very strangely. turns out he was having a mini stroke. here he is on "good morning america." >> something wasn't right. i knew i did not feel right. coy -pbt say words. couldn't say words. i thought i was saying them. my fiancee was looking at me like i was speaking a foreign language. maybe i had a bad headache, i don't know. i've never had a
assembly is the the wrong place. >> before being secretary of state, you were the ambassador to the u.n. and you've raised this issue in the past. is the u.n. losing its efficacy, is there a better way going forward to address some of these key issues? >> well, i believe in the u.n. and the security council and what has been interesting is the number of resolutions that have been taken, but ultimately what needs to happen is cooperation i think with a regional organization and one looks at what the tools are for doing something. so nato is a very important part they are in all these activities. so from their vantage point of a professor at this time, i think it is interesting to kind of look at what the tools that are available. but the united nations is the voice of the international community. what is really disappointing is the role that the russians are not playing. by taking a stand that is not helpful in terms of supporting the international community. >> would you extend that to their stance with regard to iran? >> well, i think that the iran situation is different. what is inter
any step of intervention raises questions of where it should stop. >> eliot: let's go back to the u.n. vote which gave the palestinians observer status. ambassador does that in any tangible or meaningful way change the negotiation or the balance between abbas or hamas in terms of the leader in the palestinian world? >> it's purely symbol victory. that may help him a little bit in his joust for power that he has going on with hamas. it does not change the situation on the ground between the palestinians and israel. i think this is really the decision announced by the government today to expand settlements particularly in the key parts of the eastern part of jerusalem in a large settlement block, it's very worrisome. the united states will have to criticize this. if they build those 3,000 housing settlements it effectively cuts off the northern part of the west bank from the southern part of the west bank. very worrisome if you try to negotiate a final peace deal. >> eliot: michael, i have not heard anybody that disagrees with the analysis there. that's these have an unique lick destruc
health and social services. the u.n. estimates 34 million people live with hiv and says an end to the epidemic is in sight. >> several hundred people in new jersey remain out of their hopes after an 76 car freight train derailed sending hazardous gas taryn. dozens of people were sickened from the fumes. four tank cars plunged partially into a creek. initial investigation suggests the bridge the train was crossing at the time was out of alignment. >>> ford is recalling about 90,000 cars and suvs for a potential fire risk. the recall involves its top selling escape suvs and fusion designs from the 2013 model year, ford says the engines can overheat and cause a fire. it's the fourth recall in as many months for the escape. there were no reported injuries. >>> david beckham will play his final major league soccer game today when his team plays for the title against the houstonounuston dynamo. he may play in europe or buy a soccer team. what's definite beckham says is that he will not be a coach. >> when a harness race near tirg took an odd turn the track announce
of the dictator kim jung un. >> this is against the u.n. security council resolutions and we are monitoring the situation closely. and working very closely with the self-defense force and the ministry of defense. this is a dangerous situation. and we do not support those actions right now by north korea. bill: steven yates, sir, good morning and welcome back here to america's newsroom. it's been some time since we talked about this issue. now it's back and on the plate. >> any time you are dealing with long range missile capability it will be a concern. we have thousands of troops stationed in japan and korea. there is talk of being able to reach los angeles or the western coast. no north korean test so far has reached that near abroad. bill: what would korea want to prove with this launch? >> always dangerous to try to climb into the mind of a north korean leader. but there would have to be a domestic component to the situation. there are important elections taking place in japan on the 16th and south korea on the 19th of this month. well within the range of this test that is scheduled to
. former u.n. ambassador john bolton faced similar criticism when he was up for his post, and he joins us next on whether he thinks wintour, infamously portrayed loosely in the film "the devil wears prada" has what it takes. >> oh, good morning, miranda. >> get me isaac. i don't see my breakfast here. where are my eggs? where's the piece of paper i had in my hand yesterday morning? the girls need a surfboard or spring break. nothing melts away the cold like a hot, delicious bowl of chicken noodle soup from campbell's. ♪ let it snow, let it snow ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. ♪ >> so you don't read runway? >> no. >> and before today, you had never heard of me -- >> no. >> and you have no style or sense of fashion. >> i think that depends on what your -- >> no, no, that wasn't a question. [laughter] megyn: well, the woman on whom the hit film "the devil wears prada" was reportedly based is back in the news today, and even the subject of the white house press briefing as n
point of negotiations, the appearance was that the u.n. secretary general, the u.s. secretary of state, the president of egypt and a few more foreign ministers all came in a way to save hamas and the islamic jihad. now, this is rather strange that two terrorist organizations which are involved almost endlessly in killing innocent people which are exercising the most authoritarian regime in gaza are protected by these countries. but that was the result of the way in which the whole thing was handled and i'm not sure that is helpful toward the future. >> rose: let me go back in the past. what exactly did you and mr. abbas negotiate and why did it not hold? >> well, that's a good question. first of all, it didn't hold because at the very end when we were a very, very, very close to conclude an agreement between israel and the palestinians which have -- would have resolve it had historical conflict between the two sides and would have created two states, palestinian state, you recognize boundaries and, of course, the state of israel is the home of the jewish people. in recognized bound rei
flew to dublin to hold a meeting with her russian counter part and u.n. enjoy to syria meeting to discuss how they would end the now 21-month long conflict in syria and how to move assad from power. and there's no sign they had to reverse the support, and today, a senior lawmaker says the syria government is now incapable of functioning properly. just before the meeting with the russian foreign minister, secretary clinton insisted that the united states and russia share common goals in the region. >> trying hard to work hard with russia to stop the bloodshed in syria and begin a political transition to a post asad future. the pressure against the regime in and around damascus seems to be increasing. lou: at home, leon pa net fa issuing the -- panetta issuing the sharpest warning yet. >> the president of the united states made it clear there will be consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using chemical weapons on their own people. lou: neither the white house or pentagon elaborating on what the cons -- consequences would be, but
there between israel and hamas had nothing to do with yesterday's vote at the u.n. where mahmoud abbas won his bid for the upgrade here. here's how the vote came down. >> the voting has been completed. please log the machine. 138 countries voted yes, and there were only nine no's. you and i have been talking about this the last couple of days anticipating that this was going to happen here. this was a big blow to the united states and israel that warned, look, don't go there, don't do this, and we heard from the ambassador, u.s. ambassador to u.n. susan rice immediately after the vote. i want you to see what she said. >> today's unfortunate and counter productive resolution places further obstacles in the path to peace. that is where the united states voted against it. today's grand pronouncements will soon fade, and the palestinian people will wake up tomorrow and find that little about their lives has changed. >> how is it all these other countries, how is it that the -- the united states got it right here? >> mrs. rice is correct. ms. rice is correct, and in terms of -- it's not going to be
to account. >> brown: that was a view shared by u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon, speaking at a climate conference in qatar. >> the country has a fundamental responsibility to keep this stockpile of chemical weapons in the safest way. i have warned that if in any case these should be used then there will be huge consequences and they should be accountable. >> brown: and as fears of chemical warfare grow, the humanitarian crisis has steadily worsened. more refugees streamed into turkey today, fleeing syrian air raids. >> brown: for more on the syrian chemical weapons threat i'm joined by leonard spector, a weapons and nonproliferation expert with the monterey institute of international studies. that can be hard to say. welcome back. the white house says it has increased concern the government might be prepared to use these weapons. what does that mean? what are they seeing? >> we don't know precisely what they're seeing. there are rumors that there is some sort of preparation for the chemicals that would be used in these weapons. there are preliminary steps that sometimes are taken. they
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